Date: 22nd April 2016 at 11:30am
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We all love the beautiful game. It has been reported that the Premier League is the most-watched football league in the world, broadcast in 212 territories to 643 million homes and to a potential TV audience of 4.7 billion people.

Nothing can beat the feeling of your team winning week in, week out and you just have to look at the rise of Leicester City this season to see how football can capture the heart of a nation.

3 April 2016 - Barclays Premier League - Leicester City v Southampton - Winning goalscorer Wes Morgan of Leicester City is mobbed by team mates at the full time whistle - Photo: Marc Atkins / Offside.

3 April 2016 – Barclays Premier League – Leicester City v Southampton – Winning goalscorer Wes Morgan of Leicester City is mobbed by team mates at the full time whistle – Photo: Marc Atkins / Offside.

However, whilst it may be the most popular sport in the world, it is by no means perfect. There is no other choice than to accept the flaws and the inconsistencies within the game, but with a little fine-tuning here and there, could it be made even better? Could a rule change or two make the game more enjoyable? Could football become even more popular?

Believe it or not, there was a time in football before the transfer window, before substitutions and before the card system. Not all changes to the game will benefit it, but some are definitely worth thinking about. Here are five completely alternative views to some footballing rules…

5. Diving and dissent

17 April 2016 - Barclays Premier League - Leicester City v West Ham United - Angelo Ogbonna of West Ham appears to pull back Jamie Vardy of Leicester City before Vardy is shown a 2nd yellow card for diving and sent off - Photo: Marc Atkins / Offside.

Leicester’s Jamie Vardy was shown a second yellow card for diving and sent off during last weekend’s match against West Ham United – Photo: Marc Atkins / Offside.

Diving is one of the major weaknesses of the game. There needs to be a real crackdown on simulation and the sooner it is stamped out of the game, the better. Although action can now be taken retrospectively, the punishments should be harsher and stricter to discourage feigning injury. If the laws regarding diving cannot be altered, then players and managers really should realise that they have a duty to the game itself.

Another rule that needs to be relooked at is that which surrounds dissent. Footballers can get away with absolute murder when it comes to conflict and whilst officials are encouraged to caution those who protest, how can protesting be defined? Why not follow the example of other sports and take a no tolerance stand against backchat?

Next…

 
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